Richard Marston

Richard Marston
  • James R.F. Guy Professor of Finance

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2438 Steinberg-Dietrich Hall
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: foreign exchange risk management, international asset pricing, international investments

Overview

Education

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972; BPhil, University of Oxford, 1968; AB, Yale University, 1966

Career and Recent Professional Awards; Teaching Awards

German Marshall Fund Fellow, 1981; Sanwa Bank Award, 1992

Academic Positions Held

Wharton: 1977-present (Director, Weiss Center for International Financial Research, 1992-present; Acting Director, U.S.-Japan Management Studies Center, 1989-91; named James R.F. Guy Professor of Finance and Economics, 1986). University of Pennsylvania: 1972-present. Visiting appointments: Kiel Institute; Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan; Chulalongkorn University, Thailand; Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna; Ecole Superieure des Sciences Economiques et Commerciales, Paris; London Business School

Other Positions

Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1979-present; Research Fellow, Brookings Institution, 1971-72

Professional Leadership 2005-2009

Associate Editor, Journal of International Money and Finance, 1981-present; Board of Editors, Empirical Economics, 1983-present; Board of Editors, Japan and the World Economy, 1987-present

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • FNCE208 - INTERNATIONAL CORP FINAN

    Analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in an international environment. Major topics include managing exchange risk through hedging and financing, measuring exchange rate exposure, calculating the cost of capital for foreign operations, assessment of sovereign risks, capital budgeting from a project and parent perspective, and international taxation.

  • FNCE219 - INTL FINANCIAL MARKETS

    FNCE 219 is a course on international financial markets. Major topics include foreign exchange rates, international money markets, currency and interest rate derivatives (forwards, options, and swaps), international stock and bond portfolios, and cryptocurrencies. Students learn about the features of financial instruments and the motivations of market participants. The class focuses on risk management, investing, and arbitrage relations in these markets.

  • FNCE719 - INTL FINANCIAL MARKETS

    FNCE 719 is a course on international financial markets. Major topics include foreign exchange rates, international money markets, currency and interest rate derivatives (forwards, options, and swaps), international stock and bond portfolios, and cryptocurrencies. Students learn about the features of financial instruments and the motivations of market participants. The class focuses on risk management, investing, and arbitrage relations in these markets.

  • FNCE731 - INTERNATL CORP FINANCE

    This course analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in an international environment. Major topics covered are corporate strategy and the decision to invest abroad, international portfolio diversification, managing exchange risk, taxation issues, cost of capital and financial structure in the multinational firm, and sources of financing. Departmental Website: https://fnce.wharton.upenn.edu/ Registration: Registration for MBA electives is handled through the MBA Course Auction. For questions about core courses or MBA electives that don't appear in the course auction please contact the MBA Program Office. Non-MBAs interested in graduate classes must work throught the academic department and the MBA Program Office.

  • FNCE891 - ASP-CORP RESTRUCTURING

    This course familiarizes students with financial, strategic and legal issues associated with the restructuring of financially distressed firms. The objective is to give students tools necessary to deal with the often-complex situation facing a failing firm. The participants will gain a basic understanding of the various options available for distressed firms, such as out-of-court workouts, exchange offers, prepackaged and pre-negotiated bankruptcies, distressed asset sales, 363 auctions, and Chapter 11 reorganization. We will explore the difference between economic and financial distress, and the implications for the restructuring process. Since bankruptcy provides a threat point for any distressed restructuring, the course reviews key issues of the legal framework governing bankruptcy and reorganization in the U.S. and internationally. Finally, we will consider distressed debt as an asset class and develop techniques for investing in distressed securities. The course is case based, providing ample opportunity to practice valuation of distressed companies, and hosts several guest speakers from the restructuring industry. It should be of interest for a range of careers, including private equity, investment banking, and turnaround management.

  • FNCE899 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Independent Study Projects require extensive independent work and a considerable amount of writing. ISP in Finance are intended to give students the opportunity to study a particular topic in Finance in greater depth than is covered in the curriculum. The application for ISP's should outline a plan of study that requires at least as much work as a typical course in the Finance Department that meets twice a week. At a minimum, we need a description of the methodology you intend to employ, a bibliography and description of the data that you will use as well as a list of interim deliverables and dates to ensure that you complete the project within the semester. Applications for FNCE 899 ISP's will not be accepted after the THIRD WEEK OF THE SEMESTER. You must submit your Finance ISP request using the Finance Department's ISP form located at https://fnce.wharton.upenn.edu under the Course ISP section

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Is Value Investing Really in the Doldrums?

According to some, value investing is on life support, if not dead. Wharton experts say that depends on how one measures value.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2017/11/3
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