Stephan Dieckmann

Stephan Dieckmann
  • Adjunct Full Professor of Finance
  • Deputy Vice Dean of Academic Affairs in the MBA Program Office.

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2252 Steinberg-Dietrich Hall
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: dynamic asset pricing, financial econometrics, fixed income markets, insurance economics, risk management, in particular rare event risk and credit risk

Links: Personal Website

Overview

Dr. Stephan Dieckmann is the Deputy Vice Dean of Academic Affairs in the MBA Program. He has been teaching in the Finance department at the Wharton School since 2008. His teaching portfolio includes several electives in the areas of capital markets and investments, such as Financial Derivatives and Fixed Income Securities, as well as the core course Corporate Finance. Prior to joining Wharton, he was on the Finance faculty at the W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University. Dr. Dieckmann received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University, and he has published his research in scholarly journals and has presented at international conferences and universities in the U.S. and Europe.  Dr. Dieckmann’s research interests include questions in asset pricing and insurance economics. Prior to his academic career he worked in the financial industry, where he was responsible for interest rate risk management activities, specializing in interest rate options and the management of callable debt.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • FNCE225 - FIXED INCOME SECURITIES

    (Formerly FNCE 235) This course covers fixed income securities (including fixedincome derivatives) and provides an introduction to the markets in which they are traded, as well as to the tools that are used to value these securities and to assess and manage their risk. Quantitative models play a key role in the valuation and risk management of these securities. As a result, although every effort will be made to introduce the various pricing models and techniques as intuitively as possible and the technical requirements are limited to basic calculus and statistics, the class is by its nature quantitative and will require a steady amount of work. In addition, some computer proficiency will be required for the assignments, although familiarity with a spreadsheet program (such as Microsoft Excel) will suffice. In addition to course prerequisites, FNCE 101 is recommended.

  • FNCE611 - CORPORATE FINANCE

    This course serves as an introduction to business finance (corporate financial management and investments) for both non-majors and majors preparing for upper-level course work. The primary objective is to provide the framework, concepts, and tools for analyzing financial decisions based on fundamental principles of modern financial theory. The approach is rigorous and analytical. Topics covered include discounted cash flow techniques; corporate capital budgeting and valuation; investment decisions under uncertainty; capital asset pricing; options; and market efficiency. The course will also analyze corporate financial policy, including capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, and related issues. Additional topics will differ according to individual instructors.

  • FNCE6110 - Corporate Finance

    This course serves as an introduction to business finance (corporate financial management and investments) for both non-majors and majors preparing for upper-level course work. The primary objective is to provide the framework, concepts, and tools for analyzing financial decisions based on fundamental principles of modern financial theory. The approach is rigorous and analytical. Topics covered include discounted cash flow techniques; corporate capital budgeting and valuation; investment decisions under uncertainty; capital asset pricing; options; and market efficiency. The course will also analyze corporate financial policy, including capital structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, and related issues. Additional topics will differ according to individual instructors.

  • FNCE725 - FIXED INCOME SECURITIES

    This course covers fixed income securities (including fixed income derivatives) and provides an introduction to the markets in which they are traded, as well as to the tools that are used to value these securities and to assess and manage their risk. Quantitative models play a key role in the valuation and risk management of these securities. In addition to course prerequisites, FNCE 613 is recommended but not required.

  • FNCE899 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Independent Study Projects require extensive independent work and a considerable amount of writing. ISP in Finance are intended to give students the opportunity to study a particular topic in Finance in greater depth than is covered in the curriculum. The application for ISP's should outline a plan of study that requires at least as much work as a typical course in the Finance Department that meets twice a week. Applications for FNCE 899 ISP's will not be accepted after the THIRD WEEK OF THE SEMESTER. ISP's must be supervised by a Standing Faculty member of the Finance Department.

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