Jeremy Siegel

Jeremy Siegel
  • Russell E. Palmer Professor of Finance

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    2251 Steinberg-Dietrich Hall
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: demographics, financial markets, long-run asset returns, macroeconomics

Links: CV, Personal Website

Overview

Education

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1971; BA, Columbia University, 1967

Career and Recent Professional Awards; Teaching Awards

Best Business School Professor in worldwide ranking, Business Week, 1994; Lindback Award (outstanding university teaching), 2002; Helen Kardon Moss Anvil Award (outstanding MBA teaching),1996, 2005; David W. Hauck Award for Outstanding Teaching (Wharton Undergraduate); Best Article, Graham and Dodd Award, Financial Analysts Journal, 1993; Best Article, Peter Bernstein and Frank Fabozzi Award, The Journal of Portfolio Management, 2000; The prestigious Nicholas Molodovsky Award by the Chartered Financial Analysts Institute to “those individuals who have made outstanding contributions of such significance as to change the direction of the profession and to raise it to higher standards of accomplishment,” in May 2005

Academic Positions Held

Wharton: 1976-present (named Russell E. Palmer Professor of Finance, 1998). Previous appointment: Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago, 1972-76

Other Positions

Academic Director, Securities Industry Association Institute; Senior Investment Strategy Advisor, Wisdom Tree Investments, Inc.; Investment Advisory Committee, Zeneca Inc.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • FNCE101 - MONETARY ECON & GLOB ECO

    FNCE 101 is an intermediate-level course in macroeconomics and the global economy, including topics in monetary and international economics. The goal is to provide a unified framework for understanding macroeconomic events and policy, which govern the global economic environment of business. The course analyzes the determinants and behavior of employment, production, demand and profits; inflation, interest rates, asset prices, and wages; exchange rates and international flows of goods and assets; including the interaction of the real economy with monetary policy and the financial system. The analysis is applied to current events, both in the US and abroad. HONORS FNCE 101 is only offered in the Fall semester. Registration for this class is through an application process. Please go to: https:fnce.wharton.upenn.edu/programs-course-applications, This course presents the analysis of macroeconomic theory with a current events perspective. The material in the class concentrates on lecture notes, which are the primary learning source, and readings from a course packet of articles drawn from journals, magazines, newspapers, and other economic publications. The material covered will include: (1) Economic Statistics, GDP, Price Indices,Productivity and the nature of the business cycle, (2) The government budget and Social Security, (3) Monetary policy, The Fed and other Central Banks,(4) Interest rates - indexed bonds and ther term structure (5) Aggregate Demand and the determination of income and interest rate, (6) Money and Inflation - the Velocity Approach, (7) Reaction of Financial Markets to economic data,(8) Inflation, inflationary expectations and the Phillips Curve,(9) Supply-side shocks and macro-dynamics, (10) International Balance of Payments, the current account and capital flows, (11) Determination of Exchange Rates, exchange rate systems, purchasing power and interest rate parity.

  • FNCE399 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Integrates the work of the various courses and familiarizes the student with the tools and techniques of research.

  • FNCE613 - MACROECN & GLOBAL ECONOM

    This course is required for all students except those who, having prior training in macroeconomics, money and banking, and stabilization policy at an intermediate or advanced level, can obtain a waiver by passing an examination. The purpose of FNCE 613 is to train the student to think systematically about the current state of the economy and macroeconomic policy, and to be able to evaluate the economic environment within which business and financial decisions are made. The course emphasizes the use of economic theory to understand the workings of financial markets and the operation and impact of government policies. Specifically, the course studies the determinants of the level of national income, employment, investment, interest rates, the supply of money, inflation, exchange rates, and the formulation and operation of stabilization policies.

  • FNCE899 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    Independent Study Projects require extensive independent work and a considerable amount of writing. ISP in Finance are intended to give students the opportunity to study a particular topic in Finance in greater depth than is covered in the curriculum. The application for ISP's should outline a plan of study that requires at least as much work as a typical course in the Finance Department that meets twice a week. At a minimum, we need a description of the methodology you intend to employ, a bibliography and description of the data that you will use as well as a list of interim deliverables and dates to ensure that you complete the project within the semester. Applications for FNCE 899 ISP's will not be accepted after the THIRD WEEK OF THE SEMESTER. You must submit your Finance ISP request using the Finance Department's ISP form located at https://fnce.wharton.upenn.edu under the Course ISP section

Awards and Honors

  • Lindback Award, awarded by the Lindback Society and the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation for Distinguished teaching, 2002
  • JeremySiegel.com Awarded Best Website of Business Professor, by Forbes Magazine, 2001
  • Anvil Award, Outstanding MBA Professor, 1996
  • Outstanding Business School Professor, named by Business Week, 1994
  • Winner of Graham and Dodd Award, the Association for Investment Management and Research for the best article in the Financial Analyst Journal, 1993

In the News

Knowledge @ Wharton

Activity

In the News

Will Interest Rate Hikes Hurt Stocks? Ask Jeremy Siegel

Will key issues such as potential interest rate hikes by the Fed, an inverted yield curve and the trade wars upend equity markets anytime soon?

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/07/9
All News

Awards and Honors

Lindback Award, awarded by the Lindback Society and the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation for Distinguished teaching 2002
All Awards